J. Kelly Hoey

Finding Meaning Along With Mindfulness

What’s your typical day like? For me, typical is atypical — but don’t assume atypical means it is lacking in intent or structure just because each day doesn’t start at the same desk or office or communal table in a co-working space (or time zone). This year, I’m focused on creating a “typical” routine that includes these elements:

  • Wellness from diet to physical activity
  • Mindfulness
  • Productivity
  • Purpose
  • Joy
  • Creativity

The aim is to turn these elements into habits (like flossing regularly or wearing sunscreen) so I can whip them out wherever in the world I may be (or airport I’m in en route to wherever it is I’m headed). I’m testing some apps, turning to my community for recommendations and expert advice — and yes, sharing this journey of discovery (as I know, nothing fuels a goal like community). My guess is some of you are wondering how is habit different than routine (spiraling into dull and easy-to-ignore-skip-it-because-it-is-just-this-once-or-twice-oh!-screw-it-I-want-the-fries familiarity)? Choice. How I choose to live each day versus what I know (know in a good for me because 4 out of 5 dentists say so kind of way) I should do.

“…most of us know that choosing authenticity in a culture that dictates everything from how much we’re supposed to weigh to what are houses are supposed to look like is a huge undertaking.” Brene Brown, The Gifts Of Imperfection Yes, I’m been madly consuming Brene Brown since seeing her on stage at the PA Conference for Women. Am I late to the Brene party? Not really, pouring over her wisdom at the right time for me — and yes, I’ve come to accept that I’m not an early adopter and I’m definitely a late bloomer. What else have I been reading — since “reading more” was on my list of resolutions for this year? A lot of memoirs! On my recommended reading list (if you’re going through a deep reflection stage or are seeking meaning as I seem to be):
  • Tina Brown’s The Vanity Fair Diaries 1983–1992 (oh, cause if you weren’t alive back then you need a crash course on excess, insular decision-making and trickle-down economics — and for the rest of us it is a little déjà vu)
  • Jessi Klein’s You’ll Grow Out Of It (laughter is the best medicine when you’re single woman of a certain age — and realizing you’re not alone in the crazy-making thoughts in your head)
  • Samatha Irby’s We Are Never Meeting In Real Life (NO! I did not want this book to ever end! Enough said. Read it.)
  • Scaachi Koul’s One Day We’ll All Be Dead and None Of This Will Matter(because we’ll all struggling with parental expectations and fighting the demons of societal expectations)
  • Ariel Levy’s The Rules Do Not Apply (a brave account of things society frowns upon that will cause you to delve into the shameful stories you’d hesitate to even tell your dearest friends)

If Build Your Dream Network is on your reading list (yes, one friend confessed to me this week that she had FINALLY read #BYDN over the holidays after having it sit / gather dust / languish on her bedside table for the better part of 2017 — but more on her AHA! moment when it comes to my book another time) consider signing up for NAWL’s book club on January 23 (a telephonic discussion of Build Your Dream Network lead by PWC’s Michelle Holmes-Johnson).

Looking to have #BYDN at your event, offsite or conference this year? Reach out to Erin Simpson at PRH Speakers Bureau (email: esimpson@penguinrandomhouse.com // phone: (212)-366–2263) and let’s work together to get #BYDN there.

By J. Kelly Hoey on January 18, 2018. Canonical link Exported from Medium on September 6, 2018.

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